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Posted by on Nov 20, 2015 in Uncategorized |

How to Ensure Your Thatched Roof Has a Longer Lifespan

In centuries past, having a thatched roof on your home would have been a sign that you were poorer than a person who could afford slate, for example. But now the tables have turned and a thatched roof is seen as an opulent choice for people who want to achieve a rustic aesthetic for the exterior of their home.

But thatched roofs are extremely unique in their properties, and if you don’t look after your thatched roof well, you’ll find it ageing and needing to be replaced before its time. So what are some of the things that you can do to increase the longevity of a thatched roof?

Choose the material carefully. Thatched roofs are not one-size-fits-all; you can choose from a variety of thatching materials such as longstraw, ridge, and water reed. To secure the longest lifespan, you should opt for water reed because roofs made from this material can last up to sixty years without collapsing. Of course, this is nothing compared to a slate roof, but as far as thatched roofs go, this is a long lifespan.

Opt for a high roof slope. The angle of your roof slope will also affect the lifespan of your thatched roof, and generally speaking, the steeper the angle the better. This is because rainwater will run off the roof much more quickly, and water is the enemy of a thatched roof. This is because water that sticks around can cause mould. It could also attract birds, which like to peck at thatched roofs. And the longer that water is on your roof, the greater chance there is of that water leaking through, which can then also cause problems for the interior of your building.

Brush the roof. A thatched roof also needs to be brushed on a regular basis. Head somewhere that sells roofing supplies like Combined Metal Industries and ask them for a brush specifically for brushing thatched roofs and they will be able to help you out. Brushing is important because the top thin layer of the thatch will retain the most moisture, and this is bad news because mould and algae can develop. And the longer that moisture sits in that top layer, the more chance it has of penetrating deeply into the thatch. If you feel uncomfortable getting on to your roof yourself, a roofer can also be hired to take care of this task for you.