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Posted by on Jan 22, 2016 in Uncategorized |

Clogged Central Vacuum System? 3 Areas to Look

Having a central vacuum cleaner or system in your home is convenient because of its many advantages. With this system, you can quickly clean up messes whenever they occur. Nonetheless, despite being essential, central vacuum systems are prone to clogs. The good news is that you can actually take care of this problem by yourself. The bad news is that if you don’t even know how to locate the clog in the first place, you will find yourself seeking the local central vacuum cleaning and repair services every time your system develops this problem. Therefore, to make sure that this doesn’t happen, here are 3 important areas to look at:

Filter/Bag Clogs

If your motor unit hasn’t been maintained well or if you vacuumed fine particles recently, the filter or bag of the unit can be clogged. Since locating the clog is the first thing you will have to do, it is important to look out for the signs that your system is clogged. For this reason, the clearest indicator is often low or no suction at all. If the filter or bag of your motor unit were clogged, you would observe low suction from each inlet, including the one on your motor unit itself. To take care of this problem, you need to replace the filter (for bagless units) and the bag (for bagged units).

Hose Clogs

If your motor unit is not clogged and you are still experiencing low suctions at every inlet, your hose could be the issue. The easiest way to do this is by running a ball bearing or marble through the hose to observe whether it will pass all the way through. If it doesn’t, you can clear the hose by running a plumber’s snake or a stiff wire through it. Alternatively, you can fit the hose into the inlet valve of your built in vacuum in reverse and let the system clear out the clog. Nonetheless, this may not be a good idea since you can easily transfer the clog into your central vacuum system.

Piping/Inlet Clogs

If just one inlet valve is not receiving suction and there are others, check them as well to help you isolate the clog’s location. To do this, you can place a facial tissue in front of every valve and open the valve for the tissue to be sucked in. You can then check your trash receptacle to identify whether the tissue made it down, and if it did, move to the next valve.

To take care of these clogs, you can tightly fit the hose of another vacuum cleaner to the clogged inlet valve with your built in system turned off. This will hopefully suck out the clog. You can loosen the clog by switching the other vacuum cleaner on and off.